Posts Tagged ‘Loveh’


Farming country, dense forest, picnickers, wild pigs being fed (maybe they should be called tame pigs), rugged, dry, high mountain plains. Tailwind, sidewind. Sun. We are sleeping on the carpets in the mosque meeting room. A beautiful day.

The road to Chaman Bid

The road to Chaman Bid

We started today at 100m and climbed to 1500m, and saw the landscape change. The Golestan National Park marked the start of the greenery. And it was dense. Lots of weekend picnickers were out and about, lying on their rugs in the shade, or feeding the wild pigs. Others were cruising down the road with the car windows open and the music thumping.

Wild (?) pigs in the Golestan National Park

Wild (?) pigs in the Golestan National Park

Golestan National Park

Golestan National Park

Then the scenery changed to dry. It was nice to see the transformation take place.

On the way to Chaman Bid

On the way to Chaman Bid

On the way to Chaman Bid

On the way to Chaman Bid

On the way to Chaman Bid

On the way to Chaman Bid

We’re at the top of the high pass. Tomorrow first down before climbing into Bojnurd.

Day 125. 99km. Aliabad – Loveh

Posted: August 14, 2015 in Cycling, Iran
Tags: , , ,

Sitting in the little village of Loveh, we are the talk of the town tonight. We have just talked with the next group of kids that came to visit with their mothers. Our tents are set up next to a bubbling brook looking out over the valley. It will be an early night tonight.

Our camping spot in Loveh

Our camping spot in Loveh

Given our 2am descent into slumber yesterday evening, our departure was quite late. We waved our kind hosts goodbye, and cycled into the grey. We couldn’t see the mountains, or much at all. A highlight was the stop to celebrate my 10000km. At 10008km we stopped in a town to celebrate properly with cake, and at 10015km our passports were checked.

10000km

10000km

A day on the road on the way to Mashhad.

P.S. ‘Hello!’
I stick my head out of the tent. A man is there with his little boy and a plate of food. He stokes up the fire, and we sit around trying to find room in our stomachs for the extra food. The boy takes a stick, puts it in the fire, and makes patterns in the air with the glowing embers. They smile. We smile. Hand on our heart – ‘mamnun’ – ‘thank-you!’