Posts Tagged ‘Jaban’


Cycling through Iran is about the people. The road to Mashhad was long, hilly, and full of dangerous truck drivers. Then we arrived and were welcomed into our friend’s family. The smiles on their faces – the twinkle in the eyes of 95 year old mother and father of the family – their kindness and lovingness, make cycling in Iran so special.

Lovely family in Babol

Lovely family in Babol

We arrived in Qaem Shahr as exhausted oily grease spots. The road through the mountains leading up to the high pass is never flat, climbing, then falling, and then climbing again. All this was done in the bright sun. Then descending towards the Caspian Sea, the weather changed – it was colder and started to rain. We were almost run off the road several times by some reckless truck drivers ploughing through roadworks. Our altercation with a truck driver was all made good when a man in a little shop saw it, welcomed us in, and gave us drinks and food. He was as angry about the trucks as we were.

Road to the Caspian Sea

Road to the Caspian Sea

Our evening was amazing. We met the whole family – the two brothers and their happy, smiling, welcoming 95 year-old parents. They are all so keen to show us how the people of Iran are – welcoming people, that, like everyone else in the world, just want to enjoy life, and be part of the world community.

Day 121. 111km. Tehran – Jaban

Posted: August 2, 2015 in Cycling, Iran
Tags: , , ,

Uphill through Tehran to collect our visa, and then onwards and upwards towards the Caspian Sea. Teenage kids with sticks, cramp, and lots of ‘no’s when we asked to camp made today a rather uninspiring day.

Cyclist in Iran

Cyclist in Iran

James is on his way back to Taiwan, and I now have a new cycling partner – Detlef – or, as he calls himself in English – Michael. It’s a different dynamic, and a different (and nice) cycling experience. Detlef is very forward which can charm people, but can also tell people how it is. I notice my different approach with a commonwealth upbringing. More quiet and reserved.

Leaving Tehran was stressful, with cars, buses and other vehicles cutting you off, and driving as if you don’t exist. Other drivers blast their horns in admiration and greeting, but, somehow, we could not appreciate them today.

Picnicking near the Tajikistan embassy where we collected our visa, some teenage kids decided to play smart-ass. One wanted to show the others how tough he was by brandishing a big stick at us. A stern stare from both me and Michael, and a few words from a passer-by fixed the problem.

Stopped by cramp and the setting sun, we tried to find a place to camp where we happened to find ourselves (amongst orchards – apples?). Our requests for a place to camp was met with lots of ‘no’ responses, and gates closed in our face. We find ourselves now hidden in an orchard on some (moderately) flat ground. It will be an early morning tomorrow before we are found. ☺